5 Ways You Can Practice Patience at Work

Posted by Sarah Lerche

3-minute read (600 words)

Entrepreneurs live in a world that values quick thinking and dynamic action. They believe that in order to build a successful business, they need to hustle. However, as hard as it may be, entrepreneurs should remember that patience truly is a virtue, especially in the world of business.

Learning patience will serve you well — not just with getting new business, but also with building your relationships and your brand. Here’s how you can practice patience at work when you have to wait for things to happen.

See Other People’s Perspectives

It’s easy to judge and share your opinions about how others should tackle certain problems. However, as a leader, it’s important for you to always be objective enough to step back, keep personal opinions aside and see the situation at hand through the lens of the other person. Remember that it’s your job as the leader to see the bigger picture so you can help your employees connect the dots toward a probable solution. This will allow you to step back and handle things with patience instead of acting on instinct.

Be Unbiased When Evaluating Tension Points

Evaluating tension points can reveal problem-solving patterns that can help you foresee the unexpected and get closer to understanding the root causes of problems. But this must be combined with empathy for your employees by showing that you care about their concerns and the tension points that were created. As the boss, it’s important that you remain impartial and never take sides, and are always mindful of other people’s needs, styles and approaches. Taking this unbiased, patient approach will instill trust throughout the office.

Write Down Your Goals and Review Them Frequently

Having goals like hitting a certain revenue figure or expanding to certain locations gives you a bird’s eye view of your business’ path. And attaching reasonable timelines to them will help you see how long it will take the full picture to come together, thus making you less anxious about the short term and more likely to practice patience. Remember, conducting business without any set goals is like shooting in the dark, without any aim or direction.

Seek Perspective from a Trusted Resource

If you find yourself growing too impatient to handle a particular problem, seek advice from a trusted resource or a mentor, someone who can offer you perspective. It’s important to pick your battles and to know when it’s time to seek help.

Be Responsible

As business owners, we might grow impatient with employees who don’t follow directions, don’t complete their tasks on time or are always making excuses. The next time you face such a situation, practice some patience and conduct proper due diligence. This can turn the problem into a journey of understanding and collective problem solving. And if you find that you’re responsible for the situation or the problem, be accountable and own it. This is one of the quickest ways to earn trust and respect.

Most leaders have extremely high standards and equally high demands. But avoid overly stretching your expectations for your team. Look at every opportunity to evaluate your maturity, purpose and vulnerability as a leader. The more patient you are, the more compassionate, resourceful and mindful you become as a leader.

0 Comments

Subscribe Here!